8 Facts About PCOS Every Woman Needs To Know

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is an extremely common disorder, affecting 1 in 5 women around the world. This is why it is so shocking that a) most women don’t know much about it and b) there is very little information out there regarding PCOS in the first place. Don’t worry, we’ve done our homework!

Ignorance And Lack Of Awareness Is Real

It’s very common but it isn’t easily diagnosed. One of the many symptoms of PCOS is acne, excessive hair growth (usually on the face, and chest or back) and hair loss on the head. Patients must have two of three symptoms: irregular menstrual cycles from irregular ovulation, excess androgen activity, and polycystic ovaries. Often, the combination of symptoms goes unnoticed because patients consult with separate doctors, causing an information gap. Women may also end up consulting a dermatologist but might not consider visiting a gynecologist.

Not All Women Who Suffer From PCOS Actually Have Cysts In Their Ovaries

PCOS occurs when a woman has a lot of resting follicles (fluid collections that holds eggs), but doesn’t actually ovulate. Typically, one of those follicles releases an egg from the ovary during ovulation, but this doesn’t happen with polycystic ovaries.

The Emotional Crisis Is Dreadful

Patients with PCOS exhibit a higher prevalence of depressive and anxiety related symptoms. Other mental health instabilities such as eating disorders (binge eating), which lead to obesity, are also common. Sleep disturbances are twice as common too. We’ll make it through, ladies!

Fertility Can Be A Problem

PCOS is one of the leading causes of poor fertility, but that doesn’t mean women can’t conceive at all. Women often find out they have polycystic ovary syndrome when they’re trying to conceive – but the diagnosis doesn’t mean they can’t get pregnant. In fact, this condition is usually quite simple for fertility doctors to treat with medications that can control hormones and make the body ovulate. A fertility specialist may help you by prescribing medications.

Risk Of Heart Attacks, Diabetes, Miscarriages, Pre-Term Deliveries And Stillborn Babies Is Common

1 of 10 women worldwide suffer from this hormonal disorder but not everyone goes through these issues. Yes, it’s an alarming warning, but it can definitely be managed and taken care of.

Exercise Can Help You Fight PCOS

Working out can help with PCOS by managing glucose and insulin. Exercise causes glucose to be taken from the blood and moves it into the muscles. This decreases the need for insulin and improves the body’s sensitivity to insulin. If insulin is managed, testosterone is better managed and the symptoms are likely to be decreased. Exercise also helps your body release chemicals called endorphins which help reduce anxiety and depression.

The PCOS Diet

High-fiber foods can help combat insulin resistance by slowing down digestion and reducing the impact of sugar on the blood. Great options for high-fiber foods include vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts. Red leaf lettuce, arugula, red peppers, beans, lentils, almonds, berries, sweet potatoes, winter squash and pumpkin are also beneficial. Foods that should be avoided include refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and muffins, sugary snacks and inflammatory foods, such as processed and red meats.

It’s Reversible!

Yes, you heard it right, PCOS is very much reversible. Depending on how it’s being managed or how vigorously the symptoms are being controlled, it comes and goes over a period of time. If a healthier lifestyle is adopted, almost all the symptoms of PCOS can be  reversed. A healthy lifestyle includes exercising, eating healthy, avoiding stress and lastly, having a regular sleep pattern. If you’ve been diagnosed, go to your doctor or a hormone specialist, talk through your options and do everything you can to live your best life – your future self will thank you.

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